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The Question I Most Often Get From CNET Readers Is Some Version Of: "Should I Buy A 13-inc

The question I most often get from CNET readers is some version of: "Should I buy a 13-inch MacBook Air or a 13-inch MacBook Pro?" That's a pretty easy one to f

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KAVYAE M

The question I most often get from CNET readers is some version of: "Should I buy a 13-inch MacBook Air or a 13-inch MacBook Pro?" That's a pretty easy one to field, depending on the questioner's budget and needs. But what happens when seemingly identical MacBooks, or other Mac computers like the iMac or Mac Pro, are available in both traditional Intel-based versions and new versions using Apple's own Arm-based silicon, as promised by Tim Cook during the WWDC 2020 keynote? 

That adds a whole new level of confusion to purchasing decisions, especially for something that's usually considered a big-ticket purchase like a MacBook or iMac. If you've been in the market to buy a Mac, whether upgrading your own system or getting one for a student in your family, do you buy one now? Wait til the next upgrade cycle, maybe in the fall? Or do you wait for the Arm-based new versions of these Mac to arrive? 

The question I most often get from CNET readers is some version of: "Should I buy a 13-inch MacBook Air or a 13-inch MacBook Pro?" That's a pretty easy one to field, depending on the questioner's budget and needs. But what happens when seemingly identical MacBooks, or other Mac computers like the iMac or Mac Pro, are available in both traditional Intel-based versions and new versions using Apple's own Arm-based silicon, as promised by Tim Cook during the WWDC 2020 keynote? 

That adds a whole new level of confusion to purchasing decisions, especially for something that's usually considered a big-ticket purchase like a MacBook or iMac. If you've been in the market to buy a Mac, whether upgrading your own system or getting one for a student in your family, do you buy one now? Wait til the next upgrade cycle, maybe in the fall? Or do you wait for the Arm-based new versions of these Mac to arrive? 

The question I most often get from CNET readers is some version of: "Should I buy a 13-inch MacBook Air or a 13-inch MacBook Pro?" That's a pretty easy one to field, depending on the questioner's budget and needs. But what happens when seemingly identical MacBooks, or other Mac computers like the iMac or Mac Pro, are available in both traditional Intel-based versions and new versions using Apple's own Arm-based silicon, as promised by Tim Cook during the WWDC 2020 keynote? 

That adds a whole new level of confusion to purchasing decisions, especially for something that's usually considered a big-ticket purchase like a MacBook or iMac. If you've been in the market to buy a Mac, whether upgrading your own system or getting one for a student in your family, do you buy one now? Wait til the next upgrade cycle, maybe in the fall? Or do you wait for the Arm-based new versions of these Mac to arrive? 

The question I most often get from CNET readers is some version of: "Should I buy a 13-inch MacBook Air or a 13-inch MacBook Pro?" That's a pretty easy one to field, depending on the questioner's budget and needs. But what happens when seemingly identical MacBooks, or other Mac computers like the iMac or Mac Pro, are available in both traditional Intel-based versions and new versions using Apple's own Arm-based silicon, as promised by Tim Cook during the WWDC 2020 keynote? 

That adds a whole new level of confusion to purchasing decisions, especially for something that's usually considered a big-ticket purchase like a MacBook or iMac. If you've been in the market to buy a Mac, whether upgrading your own system or getting one for a student in your family, do you buy one now? Wait til the next upgrade cycle, maybe in the fall? Or do you wait for the Arm-based new versions of these Mac to arrive? 

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