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And Will They Look The Same? Have The Same Names? You May Recall (at Least I Do) That When

And will they look the same? Have the same names? You may recall (at least I do) that when Apple transitioned to Intel chips from PowerPC, it was with an entire

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KAVYAE M

And will they look the same? Have the same names? You may recall (at least I do) that when Apple transitioned to Intel chips from PowerPC, it was with an entirely new product line, called MacBook. There has never been a non-Intel MacBook, until now, at least. 

Having a single product line, with both Intel and Apple silicon versions, is just a recipe for trouble -- no one wants to drop $1,299 on a new MacBook, only to have picked the "wrong" one. Not that we're entirely sure the same exact product will exist with two platform choices at the same time. At the WWDC keynote, Apple said that its first Arm-based computers will be available by the end of the year, while the entire transition will take at least two years. 

And will they look the same? Have the same names? You may recall (at least I do) that when Apple transitioned to Intel chips from PowerPC, it was with an entirely new product line, called MacBook. There has never been a non-Intel MacBook, until now, at least. 

Having a single product line, with both Intel and Apple silicon versions, is just a recipe for trouble -- no one wants to drop $1,299 on a new MacBook, only to have picked the "wrong" one. Not that we're entirely sure the same exact product will exist with two platform choices at the same time. At the WWDC keynote, Apple said that its first Arm-based computers will be available by the end of the year, while the entire transition will take at least two years. 

And will they look the same? Have the same names? You may recall (at least I do) that when Apple transitioned to Intel chips from PowerPC, it was with an entirely new product line, called MacBook. There has never been a non-Intel MacBook, until now, at least. 

Having a single product line, with both Intel and Apple silicon versions, is just a recipe for trouble -- no one wants to drop $1,299 on a new MacBook, only to have picked the "wrong" one. Not that we're entirely sure the same exact product will exist with two platform choices at the same time. At the WWDC keynote, Apple said that its first Arm-based computers will be available by the end of the year, while the entire transition will take at least two years. 

And will they look the same? Have the same names? You may recall (at least I do) that when Apple transitioned to Intel chips from PowerPC, it was with an entirely new product line, called MacBook. There has never been a non-Intel MacBook, until now, at least. 

Having a single product line, with both Intel and Apple silicon versions, is just a recipe for trouble -- no one wants to drop $1,299 on a new MacBook, only to have picked the "wrong" one. Not that we're entirely sure the same exact product will exist with two platform choices at the same time. At the WWDC keynote, Apple said that its first Arm-based computers will be available by the end of the year, while the entire transition will take at least two years. 

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