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WikiLeaks Founder Julian Assange Has Been Charged With A Second Superseding Indictment For

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange has been charged with a second superseding indictment for allegedly recruiting hackers and conspiring with them to commit compu

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KAVYAE M
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WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange has been charged with a second superseding indictment for allegedly recruiting hackers and conspiring with them to commit computer crimes, the Justice Department said Wednesday.

The new indictment doesn't add to the 18-count indictment filed against Assange last year under the Espionage Act, but it does "broaden the scope of the conspiracy surrounding alleged computer intrusions with which Assange was previously charged," the Justice Department said in a statement.

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The WikiLeaks founder is facing potential extradition to the US after he was arrested last year in London on charges including unlawfully obtaining and disclosing classified documents. The department called it "one of the largest compromises of classified information in the history of the United States."

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Assange and WikiLeaks, which launched in 2006, have been under scrutiny since the highly publicized 2010 leak of diplomatic cables and military documents.

In the first decade after its 2006 launch, WikiLeaks released -- by its own count -- more than 10 million secret documents. The leaks ranged from a video showing an American Apache helicopter in the Iraq War shooting and killing two journalists in 2007 to emails from the Democratic National Committee and Hillary Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta during the 2016 presidential race.

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange has been charged with a second superseding indictment for allegedly recruiting hackers and conspiring with them to commit computer crimes, the Justice Department said Wednesday.

The new indictment doesn't add to the 18-count indictment filed against Assange last year under the Espionage Act, but it does "broaden the scope of the conspiracy surrounding alleged computer intrusions with which Assange was previously charged," the Justice Department said in a statement.

For more like this

Subscribe to the CNET Now newsletter for our editors' picks for the most important stories of the day.

 Yes, I want to receive the CNET Insider Newsletter, keeping me up to date with all things CNET.

SIGN ME UP!

By signing up, you agree to the CBS Terms of Use and acknowledge the data practices in our Privacy Policy. You may unsubscribe at any time.

The WikiLeaks founder is facing potential extradition to the US after he was arrested last year in London on charges including unlawfully obtaining and disclosing classified documents. The department called it "one of the largest compromises of classified information in the history of the United States."

RELATED STORIES

Trump offered WikiLeaks' Assange a pardon to cover up Russian hack, lawyer tells court

Sweden drops rape investigation against Julian Assange

US charges Julian Assange with violating the Espionage Act

Assange and WikiLeaks, which launched in 2006, have been under scrutiny since the highly publicized 2010 leak of diplomatic cables and military documents.

In the first decade after its 2006 launch, WikiLeaks released -- by its own count -- more than 10 million secret documents. The leaks ranged from a video showing an American Apache helicopter in the Iraq War shooting and killing two journalists in 2007 to emails from the Democratic National Committee and Hillary Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta during the 2016 presidential race.

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