YouTube Can Ban Users That It Deems “no Longer Commercially Viable”, The Google-owned Serv

International Business

YouTube can ban users that it deems “no longer commercially viable”, the Google-owned service states in its updated terms of service — which come into effect De

Written By s mahe | Mumbai | Updated On:
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YouTube can ban users that it deems “no longer commercially viable”, the Google-owned service states in its updated terms of service — which come into effect December 10 — that is leading to panic and uproar among the creator community of the world's biggest video-sharing platform. Owing to the possible subjective interpretations of the broad “commercially viable” wording, YouTube creators are worried that the company will make use of the new policy to terminate accounts it doesn't “like for any reason”. In a statement to Gadgets 360, YouTube said it is “not changing the way our products work”.

Over the weekend in an email, YouTube notified its users about the new terms of service. The email's summary of changes said it was making them “clearer and easier to understand” and “better alignment between the terms and how YouTube works today”. The email didn't have anything to say about changes to termination policies, though the summary on YouTube.com did note that the new terms of service “now include more details about when we might need to terminate our agreement with bad actors.” Still, there was no mention of the “commercially viable” part, which only appears in the full text as:

YouTube can ban users that it deems “no longer commercially viable”, the Google-owned service states in its updated terms of service — which come into effect December 10 — that is leading to panic and uproar among the creator community of the world's biggest video-sharing platform. Owing to the possible subjective interpretations of the broad “commercially viable” wording, YouTube creators are worried that the company will make use of the new policy to terminate accounts it doesn't “like for any reason”. In a statement to Gadgets 360, YouTube said it is “not changing the way our products work”.

Over the weekend in an email, YouTube notified its users about the new terms of service. The email's summary of changes said it was making them “clearer and easier to understand” and “better alignment between the terms and how YouTube works today”. The email didn't have anything to say about changes to termination policies, though the summary on YouTube.com did note that the new terms of service “now include more details about when we might need to terminate our agreement with bad actors.” Still, there was no mention of the “commercially viable” part, which only appears in the full text as:

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